Caring Together in Eastern Cheshire

The aim of Caring Together is to deliver a new system of health and social care across Eastern Cheshire that joins-up local care for all our wellbeing.  It’s about the providers of care working with the people who receive care, their support networks, family, friends and carers.

This is your Caring Together Engagement HQ - a place where you can find information, view our latest updates, share your experiences, tell us your views and get involved.

For more information on how to join the conversation, and why, read the campaign leaflet.

The aim of Caring Together....Read more

The aim of Caring Together is to deliver a new system of health and social care across Eastern Cheshire that joins-up local care for all our wellbeing.  It’s about the providers of care working with the people who receive care, their support networks, family, friends and carers.

This is your Caring Together Engagement HQ - a place where you can find information, view our latest updates, share your experiences, tell us your views and get involved.

For more information on how to join the conversation, and why, read the campaign leaflet.

The aim of Caring Together is to deliver a new system of health and social care across Eastern Cheshire that joins-up local care for all our wellbeing.  It’s about the providers of care working with the people who receive care, their support networks, family, friends and carers.

This is your Caring Together Engagement HQ - a place where you can find information, view our latest updates, share your experiences, tell us your views and get involved.

The Caring Together programme is being led by NHS Eastern Cheshire Clinical Commissioning Group in partnership with Cheshire East Council, and supported by East Cheshire NHS Trust, Cheshire & Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust and the 23 GP Practices across Eastern Cheshire.

The focus is on:

  • finding out what works and what doesn’t for all involved
  • sharing experiences, knowledge and information
  • improving communication between everyone
  • finding out what is stopping care being integrated and working around it
  • taking out duplication and confusion
  • giving people the help they need so they can take charge of their care.

To contact us please:

  • Call - 01625 242 511 
  • Email - join@caringtogether.info
  • Freepost to - FREEPOST: RTGC-EBAX-HHZH, NHS Eastern Cheshire CCG: CARING TOGETHER, 1st Floor, West Wing,   New Alderley Building, Victoria Rd, Macclesfield, SK10 3BL

News

  • Interview with Dr Paddy Kearns

    Canalside Community Radio recently interviewed local GP, Paddy Kearns, about Caring Together. If you missed it, you can listen again below.

    Canalside Community Radio recently interviewed local GP, Paddy Kearns, about Caring Together. If you missed it, you can listen again below.

    by Ian Rhodes 05 Aug 2014, 02:08 PM
  • Caring Together Takes to the Stage

    The people of Eastern Cheshire glimpsed the future of health and social care in a series of ‘now and then’ live-action scenarios played out at the third Caring Together stakeholder event.

    Seventy people attended the all-day event at the Masonic Hall in Macclesfield, representing local residents and both public and voluntary organisations involved in health and social care.


    The people of Eastern Cheshire glimpsed the future of health and social care in a series of ‘now and then’ live-action scenarios played out at the third Caring Together stakeholder event.

    Seventy people attended the all-day event at the Masonic....Read more

    The people of Eastern Cheshire glimpsed the future of health and social care in a series of ‘now and then’ live-action scenarios played out at the third Caring Together stakeholder event.

    Seventy people attended the all-day event at the Masonic Hall in Macclesfield, representing local residents and both public and voluntary organisations involved in health and social care.


    The people of Eastern Cheshire glimpsed the future of health and social care in a series of ‘now and then’ live-action scenarios played out at the third Caring Together stakeholder event.

    Seventy people attended the all-day event at the Masonic Hall in Macclesfield, representing local residents and both public and voluntary organisations involved in health and social care.

    Previous events had focused on the abstract models of care proposed by Caring Together, but this time they were brought to life by the fictional Cranford family, played by the Manchester-based Adhoc Actors group.

    The scenarios looked at a day in the life of Edward and Elsie Cranford, their son and daughter-in-law, John and Liz, and their two year old son, Bryn.

    Both Edward and Elsie are in their 80s and though Edward is reasonably healthy for his age, he has the pressure of being the main carer for Elsie who can be confused and forgetful due to mild dementia.

    John and Liz have family health problems and busy lives of their own, as well as the stress of supporting John’s parents to deal with – support that isn’t always appreciated by the proud and independent Edward.

    The morning session focused on how a typical day might pan out now, when a straight forward health appointment spirals out of control to affect the whole family.

    There were regular breaks for the audience to discuss what works well with the system now and what doesn’t, and then in the afternoon the same day was played out as it could look in the future under the Caring Together model.

    “The idea was to make Caring Together real and meaningful for the audience,” said Dr Paul Bowen, Chair of NHS Eastern Cheshire Clinical Commissioning Group who introduced the event.

    “We may have used dramatic licence with the scenarios, but the issues faced by the Cranfords are typical of those I see every day as a local GP. Using actors to illustrate those issues helped the audience to connect and focus on what we can do to improve matters and support people like the Cranfords.”

    The event ended with a question and answer session with a panel that included Brenda Smith, Director of Adult Social Care and Independent Living at Cheshire East Council.

    She said: “Caring Together proposes fundamental changes to the way we provide health and social care, changes that will put people at the heart of an integrated service that provides seamless care when and where they need it.

    “The response from event was both positive and constructive and a real opportunity for local people to influence our thinking.”

    by Ian Rhodes 30 Jul 2014, 04:28 PM
  • Caring Together Made Real

    Personal experience of the successes and failures of the NHS can be a major motivator for change and this is certainly true for Sam Nicol, the Programme Director for Caring Together.

    Her father died in 2011 after suffering from Parkinson’s Disease and the related Lewy body dementia that affected him physically, as well as mentally.


    Personal experience of the successes and failures of the NHS can be a major motivator for change and this is certainly true for Sam Nicol, the Programme Director for Caring Together.

    Her father died in 2011 after suffering from Parkinson’s Disease and the....Read more

    Personal experience of the successes and failures of the NHS can be a major motivator for change and this is certainly true for Sam Nicol, the Programme Director for Caring Together.

    Her father died in 2011 after suffering from Parkinson’s Disease and the related Lewy body dementia that affected him physically, as well as mentally.


    Personal experience of the successes and failures of the NHS can be a major motivator for change and this is certainly true for Sam Nicol, the Programme Director for Caring Together.

    Her father died in 2011 after suffering from Parkinson’s Disease and the related Lewy body dementia that affected him physically, as well as mentally.

    “The care and support he received from the NHS was poor in so many ways,” she says. “We were left without any definite diagnosis for 18 months and through it all it was my mum who kept him going with no knowledge, no information and no support.

    “And there was me – an NHS manager – struggling with the system. I wondered how so-called ‘ordinary’ people coped in similar situations.”

    Sam was leading on the integrated care programme in Trafford at the time and the failures in care leading up to her father’s death made her question her entire NHS career and ask herself whether she should walk away altogether.

    “I was still angry about it a few months later when the job of Programme Director for Caring Together came available and I decided that dad would want me to channel that anger and energy into making a real difference.”

    The originator of the Trafford programme, Martin Connor, and the NHS Leadership Academy had organised visits to study the models of healthcare in other countries, particularly the integrated care model developed in the US by Kaiser Pemanente.

    Paul Bowen and Rob Stead, medical directors of the CCG and hospital trust respectively, had taken part in the visit to California and they were impressed by a system that was clinically led and which brought high quality care coordinated between hospital and community based services.

    “This is the quality of care we aspire to for the people of Eastern Cheshire,” says Sam. “Of course there are other factors driving the need for change – not least the financial shortfall and the changing demographics – but at the heart of our proposals is the conviction that local people deserve better care.

    “That is what Caring Together is all about – getting people together to work out a shared vision for the future. This has taken a huge amount of engagement with organisations and individuals and it is my view that we got the values and principles right to keep people at the table.”

    Caring Together is on the verge of moving on to the next stage, taking the results of those discussions on the future of integrated care in Eastern Cheshire to public consultation.

    A director of transition is to be appointed to oversee the next phase as Sam is leaving in August to lead a county-wide programme of change in Lancashire.

    “My time in Eastern Cheshire has been exciting and rewarding on both a professional and personal level. In many ways it has restored my belief that the NHS can change and do better for people like my dad.”

    The changes heralded by Caring Together will take time to implement, so what does Sam think success would look like if she were to return in two or three years’ time?

    “I would see little difference on the outside, but I would hope that there would be fewer people attending hospital and many more services being provided at home or close to where people live.

    “Also if I were to stop an older person on the street and ask about their care plan and their relationship with their GP and community team, they would know exactly what I was talking about and not speaking a foreign language.”

    Sam is leaving having achieved a great deal in developing the new model of care with council, hospital and other partners, as well as involving the public in shaping the future of health and social care in Eastern Cheshire.

    “The plan we are to publish in August is the culmination of a tremendous amount of work by a great many people,” she says. “But the effort will be worthwhile if it means we build a better system of care than the one that failed my dad.”

    by Ian Rhodes 16 Jul 2014, 09:59 AM
  • Caring Together Taking Shape for Stakeholders

    Providing more health services in the community, patient-centred care and greater integration between primary and community care were the three key themes that came out of the second Caring Together Stakeholder Panel.


    Providing more health services in the community, patient-centred care and greater integration between primary and community care were the three key themes that came out of the second Caring Together Stakeholder Panel.

    The event, held in Congleton on 21 May, involved 40 people representing service users, those who provide services, as well as community groups and partner organisations.

    There was general support for the service changes....Read more

    Providing more health services in the community, patient-centred care and greater integration between primary and community care were the three key themes that came out of the second Caring Together Stakeholder Panel.


    Providing more health services in the community, patient-centred care and greater integration between primary and community care were the three key themes that came out of the second Caring Together Stakeholder Panel.

    The event, held in Congleton on 21 May, involved 40 people representing service users, those who provide services, as well as community groups and partner organisations.

    There was general support for the service changes proposed by the Caring Together programme and the participants felt that offering people one clear point of access and better signposting into services would be a major benefit, particularly in primary care.

    Empowering patients was also seen as an essential element that needs to underpin the proposals if they are to truly deliver patient centred care.

    Other positive comments on the proposed models of care included:

    • Better access to clinicians, good staff and specialists
    • Services will be local meaning less travelling
    • More health prevention measures
    • Tele medicine for non IT users

    What wasn’t always clear was how the different models of care interlink and there was some confusion between different elements of the proposals. Some felt that information overload and jargon made it difficult to understand the models of care.

    How the different organisations are able to access and share information to make the models work was also a challenge and comments included:

    • How will the models ensure that partner organisations and systems work together?
    • How will the trade-off between ensuring high quality and local accessibility be addressed?
    • How will statutory and legislative requirements impact upon the implementation of the models?

    Others asked exactly how patients will be empowered by the proposals, and in particular how vulnerable and socially isolated groups will be reached and will they be able to cope with the increased use of technology.

    Transport and accessibility issues and how the models would meet the need of rural communities was an important topic. But while the emphasis is on providing care at a more local level, some participants said they would be prepared to travel for high quality specialist care when needed, but how far and for what needs to be determined.

    The overall response to the Caring Together Models was positive, but there is clearly more work to be done which the stakeholder panel will help to develop in future meetings.

    by Ian Rhodes 16 Jul 2014, 09:58 AM
  • What about the workers?

    The success of Caring Together will depend on developing the programme of change and designing services with the full involvement of frontline staff and leaders and the Office for Public Management is using Eastern Cheshire as a case study of this process.


    The success of Caring Together will depend on developing the programme of change and designing services with the full involvement of frontline staff and leaders and the Office for Public Management is using Eastern Cheshire as a case study of this process.

    As early as 2011, the partner organisations began focusing on engaging staff as a key....Read more

    The success of Caring Together will depend on developing the programme of change and designing services with the full involvement of frontline staff and leaders and the Office for Public Management is using Eastern Cheshire as a case study of this process.


    The success of Caring Together will depend on developing the programme of change and designing services with the full involvement of frontline staff and leaders and the Office for Public Management is using Eastern Cheshire as a case study of this process.

    As early as 2011, the partner organisations began focusing on engaging staff as a key element in transforming the workforce to match the emerging vision for an integrated health and social care system for this part of Cheshire.

    A programme was designed to promote joint working, training and development, HR processes and communications and engagement.  Frontline staff and their managers formed the key focus of these projects, specifically those working in community and local settings.

    The projects fell under three main headings – Training and Development, Recruitment and Human Resources and Communications and Engagement.

    Achievements of the project so far include:

    • Creation of a Wellbeing Coordinator to work with older people in supporting them to adopt a healthier lifestyle and to navigate services, the aim being to reduce GP visits and hospital admissions. This was achieved with the help of Skills for Health and Age UK.
    • A HR Graduate Trainee joined the economy in 2012, working across the Clinical Commissioning Group, the council and two of the partner trusts;
    • Setting up a management training programme and action learning set to identify the skills and behaviours needed for integrated working and to develop the leaders of the new integrated teams;
    • The Caring Together partners have committed to jointly running a government pre-employment scheme for people experiencing long term unemployment. Seventeen places will initially be made available on this scheme;
    • Joint briefings have brought together local trade unions and partner organisations, resulting in an open and transparent relationship with the unions, ensuring ‘no surprises’ as future challenges emerge as the process of transformation begins to have direct impact on staff.

    The Office for Public Management will be publishing the report and the key learning points on their website.

    by Ian Rhodes 16 Jul 2014, 09:57 AM
  • Targeted Engagement to Seldom Heard and Hard to Reach Groups

    During July will be conducting a series of outreach targeted engagement activities in local communities to try and inform and address concerns of those whose voices are seldom heard in health and social care.

    We will be working extensively with our key partners through this process: Cheshire & Wirral Partnership, CVS Cheshire East, Peaks & Plains Housing Trust, Plus Dane Group and Age UK.


    During July will be conducting a series of outreach targeted engagement activities in local communities to try and inform and address concerns of those whose voices are seldom heard in healthcare.

    We will be....Read more

    During July will be conducting a series of outreach targeted engagement activities in local communities to try and inform and address concerns of those whose voices are seldom heard in health and social care.

    We will be working extensively with our key partners through this process: Cheshire & Wirral Partnership, CVS Cheshire East, Peaks & Plains Housing Trust, Plus Dane Group and Age UK.


    During July will be conducting a series of outreach targeted engagement activities in local communities to try and inform and address concerns of those whose voices are seldom heard in healthcare.

    We will be working extensively with our key partners through this process: Cheshire & Wirral Partnership, CVS Cheshire East, Peaks & Plains Housing Trust, Plus Dane Group and Age UK.

    Those who will be targeted are:

    • Working parents
    • Younger people
    • Isolated older people and communities
    • New mothers
    • Black and Ethic Minority and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transexual communities
    • People with mental health conditions

    It will include face-to-face surveys at shopping centres and community centres; selective telephone; joining group meetings, such as mums and tots, mental health forums etc; and at local community meetings arranged by Caring Together.

    At each meeting, the topic guide and exercises will be tailored to that group so that it is appropriate and engaging. The surveys designed will reflect the topic guide to ensure common themes can be cross tabulated.

    By engaging with these groups, as well as those who participate at our regular engagement activities, and getting early insight at this stage in the programme, we will set the foundations for more difficult and complex conversations as the process progresses.

    A full report on activities will be available in August 2014.

    by Ian Rhodes 16 Jul 2014, 09:55 AM
  • Remember to register!

    Open-uri20140820-1446-y8s8k0?1408508671

    Please remember to register for our Stakeholder event on the 25th July in Macclesfield.  Full details on the attached invitation.  Register by the 11th July to ensure you reserve your place.

    Please remember to register for our Stakeholder event on the 25th July in Macclesfield.  Full details on the attached invitation.  Register by the 11th July to ensure you reserve your place.

    by Louise Booth 08 Jul 2014, 01:19 PM
  • Useful Information

    Caring Together is not alone in finding new ways of integrating health and social care – it is something services across the country aspire to. In this regular item we point the way towards information you will find useful as we move forward with our local plans.


    Caring Together is not alone in finding new ways of integrating health and social care – it is something services across the country aspire to. In this regular item we point the way towards information you will find useful as we move forward with our local plans.

    Integrated Care Pioneers: Indicators for....Read more

    Caring Together is not alone in finding new ways of integrating health and social care – it is something services across the country aspire to. In this regular item we point the way towards information you will find useful as we move forward with our local plans.


    Caring Together is not alone in finding new ways of integrating health and social care – it is something services across the country aspire to. In this regular item we point the way towards information you will find useful as we move forward with our local plans.

    Integrated Care Pioneers: Indicators for measuring integrated care

    The Policy Innovation Research Unit is carrying out two projects looking at the Integrated Care Pioneers announced by NHS England last year which Caring Together is part of.

    The first project is to convene an expert group to provide advice to the Pioneers on routinely collected data that they can use individually and collectively to monitor their progress. The second project is to carry out a largely qualitative early evaluation focusing on progress of the Pioneers in the first 12 months in relation to their first year integration objectives. 

    A report is expected to be published in the autumn, meanwhile you can read more about the early evaluation here and download the Indicators for Measuring the Quality of Integrated Care.

    A new settlement for health and social care

    The independent Commission on the Future of Health and Social Care in England has published its interim report explaining why it believes that England needs a single health and social care system, with a ring-fenced, singly commissioned budget, and more closely aligned entitlements.

    The report draws on accounts from patients and their families, and the commission argues that the current system is no longer fit for purpose. You can read more on the King’s Fund website and download a copy of the report.

    Supporting people to manage their health

    One of the key messages to come out of the Caring Together stakeholder panels is that people should be encouraged to take more responsibility for managing their own health. The King’s Fund describes such ‘patient activation’ as a way of reducing health inequalities and delivering improved outcomes, as well as better quality care and lower costs.

    You can read more about Supporting people to manage their health here or download a copy of the report.

    Community Services: How they can transform care

    Published earlier this year, this paper looks at the changes needed to realise the full potential of community services for transforming care. It is based on contributions from a working group of community providers convened by The King’s Fund and you can read more here or download a copy of the report.

    by Ian Rhodes 30 Jun 2014, 11:26 AM
  • Stakeholder Panel Event 3 Confirmed

    Open-uri20140820-1446-1nocfkc?1408508680

    We are delighted to announce our next Stakeholder event on the 25 July in Macclesfield.  Full details are on the attached invitation.  This is really going to be a very interactive session, so we hope as many people as possible can attend.  Also attached is the report from the last Panel event held in Congleton.

    As before, participants may claim their travel expenses and refreshments will be served throughout the day.  Please register by the 11 July as places are limited.  Register by emailing join@caringtogether.info or call  01625 242 511.

    We are delighted to announce our next Stakeholder event on the 25 July in Macclesfield.  Full details are on the attached invitation.  This is really going to be a very interactive session, so we hope as many people as possible can attend.  Also attached is the report from the last Panel event held in Congleton.

    As before, participants may claim their travel expenses and refreshments will be served throughout the day.  Please register by the 11 July as places are limited.  Register by emailing join@caringtogether.info or call  01625 242 511.

    by Louise Booth 26 Jun 2014, 11:33 AM
  • Complete our survey

    Open-uri20140820-1446-c4nawh?1408508689

    The Caring Together team are out across Eastern Cheshire talking to people about their experiences of health and social care services.  From now until the end of June, the team can be found at a range of supermarkets and other outlets across Esatern Cheshire.

    If you don't see the team out, then please take the time to complete our survey here.

    The Caring Together team are out across Eastern Cheshire talking to people about their experiences of health and social care services.  From now until the end of June, the team can be found at a range of supermarkets and other outlets across Esatern Cheshire.

    If you don't see the team out, then please take the time to complete our survey here.

    by Louise Booth 03 Jun 2014, 03:24 PM